ONLINE VIRTUAL TOUR
CATP AIR MUSEUM
Mission 9


 DISPLAY NO. 14:
METRIC TOOLS MADE BY GROUND CREW
Number 14 is a display of  some tools that were made by some of the ground crew. The aircraft that came to Canada  from Britain all had British Standard Whitworth "BSW" measurements but we were using a slightly different modification of this Imperial mearsurement.  Wrenches were not supplied with the aircraft, so the mechanics had to make their own.

British Standard  Whitworth BSW Style Tools Made By Ground Crew



LOCATIONS OF BCATP STATIONS

Behind you are two free standing displays which depict the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan stations and aircraft across Canada. If you look at western Canada and at Manitoba in particular, it gives you some idea of how many aircraft there were in the air at anyone time during that period.  We had fields at Dauphin, Paulson, Neepawa, MacDonald, Gimli, two or three in Winnipeg, two in Portage, one in Carberry, Brandon, Souris, and  Rivers.  Rivers was the first navigation school and indeed the first navigators graduated from Number 1 Central Navigation School in 1940.  By taking a close look at these two displays you will be able to gain some appreciation of the magnitude of the Training Plan not only in equipment and airfields but in man power as well.  There were 131,000 aircrew  consisting of Australians, New Zealanders, British and Canadians who were trained under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.  In order to keep those people in the air a large number of ground staff were required, there were some 80,000 ground crew trained.  They were the aero engine mechanics, airframe mechanics, instrument technicians, riggers, fitters, armourers, etc.  It took about fifteen men on the ground to keep one man in the air.

BCATP Training Bases and Aircraft CollageBCATP Training Bases and Aircraft Collage
Close-up of Manitoba & Saskatchewan Bases Collage


DISPLAY NO. 15:
REPAIR TECH INSTRUMENTS & TEST EQUIPMENT

By turning around, once again, you should be in front of display number 15.  This case contains some of the instruments and the test equipment that the instrument repair technician used to do his job. The photo shows a typical repair bench.

Instruments and Test Equipment Used by Repair Technicians


DISPLAY NO. 16:
AIR FRAME & AERO-ENGINE TOOLS & TRAINING MATERIAL

Moving to your left is display number 16. This case shows some of the tools and training material used by the air frame and aero-engine trade. As part of the training the students had to make various items to prove their skills.One such item is the “V” shaped block shown here. The student had to fashion this out a rectangle of metal by using a file and a hack saw. When the block was held together, it had to fit well enough so that no light could be seen around the edges of the “V.”  The other block with bolts screwed into it was made by the student out of a block of metal and some pieces metal rod. The student had to bore and thread a hole then thread the rod and make sure every thing fit. Air frame mechanics had to be able to build frame parts from raw pieces of metal. Note the aluminum parts made for aircraft repairs, some from new material and some from used.

Air Frame & Aero-Engine Tools with Aluminum Aircraft Parts - Training Material


DISPLAY NO. 17:
ARMOURER DISPLAY: BOMBS & GUNS

Next in line is display number 17.  The armourers display. The armourer had to know how to load and arm bombs, flare pistols, as well as several different calibre and types of guns.

Armourer Display: Bombs and GunsDrogue ReceiverFlare PistolGun Sight


DISPLAYS NO 18:
ELECTRICAL & COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT

Display case number 18 contains radio transmitters, receivers, radar scopes, test equipment, equipment to provide the proper electrical supply to these units and an antennae post.

Electrical and Communication Equipment: Hangar Displays in Background


 DISPLAY NO. 19:
DRIFT METER & DRIFT RECORDER

Display number 19 contains a drift meter and a drift recorder.   As you may or may not realize a flying aircraft’s course is subject to wind speed and direction.  The aircraft will drift downwind and a correction to the course will have to be made.  To determine how far the aircraft heading was different from the desired course,  the drift meter and drift recorder was used to calculate the amount of drift and the course could then be corrected.

Drift Meters and Recorders


DISPLAY No. 20:
OPERATIONAL AIRCRAFT MODELS

This display contains a number of operational aircraft models.  Note the various camouflage colours used, depending on the area in which the plane was stationed.

Operational Aircraft ModelsOperational Aircraft Models


ROYAL FAMILY PICTURES
We’ll now go downstairs and ask that you turn to your left at the bottom of the stairs.  As you go downstairs you may  want to take a glance at the picture of some members of the Royal Family of 1937-1938 vintage.  This is a picture of King George V, King George VI and King Edward VIII.

Royal Family Picture: King George VI - King George V - King Edward VIII


DISPLAY NO. 21:
MEDALS OF VALOUR: VICTORIA CROSS

As you come off the stairs and turn left the case you see is number 21. This  is a display of the various medals of valour, including the Victoria Cross which is the highest award for bravery in the British Commonwealth. In the first world war three men from the same street in Winnipeg, Manitoba were each awarded the VC. The name of the street was changed to Valour Road.
 

Medals of Valour


Back to 8: Uniforms - Emergency Equipment -SouvenirsForward to 10: Manning Depot - Photos
Home Base

Webmaster: William G. Hillman
BILL & SUE-ON HILLMAN ECLECTIC STUDIO
Photos by Bill Hillman ~ Copyrighted 1999/2010