FEBRUARY 2004



(A) (B)

 Aircraft identification  pamphlet 1942
To fire or not to fire, that is the question.

(D) (E)
To refresh your memory see answers in Editors Report

Art and Noreen Hawtin 
by Halifax  NA 337  being restored at Trenton Museum
ARTHUR HAWTIN
Beaverton, Ont.

Art Hawtin’s long search for a Dutch-born Canadian who knew something about the Dutch town near where his plane crashed during WW11 has finally paid off. Every time he met one he would ask them if they knew where Dedemsvaart was.  A few months go his heart skipped a beat when he popped the question to a provincial natural resources official. The official told Art that it was where his aunt lived. Her farm was approximately 300 or 400 metres from where their plane crashed May 13/14, 1943.
The official contacted his aunt who wrote the Hawtins and gave them an open invitation to stay at their farm.

Hawtin who served as a Navigator on 405 Squadron, Halifax aircraft, because the casualty rate in Bomber Command was so high, considers himself “one of the lucky ones”. Of the seven members in the crew only four were able to bail out after the plane was hit by enemy fire and burst into flames. Art spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft 3 POW  camp in Sagan. As the fighting neared its end, Art and thousands of other prisoners were forced to march west as the Russians were advancing, and then east to avoid the British. This was in harsh weather from January to May 1945.

Art and his wife Noreen are considering visiting Dedemsvaart this spring.



PHIL DUBOIS
Gibsons B.C.

I am enclosing a number of letters from my RAF friend Harry McLean. Harry was an experienced mid-upper gunner when we arrived on 427 Sqdrn. In late July 1943. His pilot was Billy Biggs, RAF, an original member of 427. Our pilot, Sgt. Bob Deegan, later S/L, of Smith Falls, Ont., did his first “second dickie” trip with Bill and crew.

(Ed. The letters from Harry McLean are quite long so I have attempted to abridge some of them. They will be spread out over the next number of newsletters.)


Harry McLean and Phil Dubois, Leeming, Yorks 1993
The Night of Sept. 6th. 1943  by Harry Mclean

P/O Biggs and his crew were awakened about mid-day while they were sleeping after Operations to Mannheim the previous night. Sleep after a bombing raid was always fitful and light. At briefing the crew were informed that the ‘Bomber Stream’ would be routed over London on the way out to allow the population to hear how our reply to the German blitzes sounded.

At take off the port outer engine failed to give maximum boost causing the aircraft to swing, but Briggs managed to get off safely. Over London there was a near collision with a Lancaster bomber flying in the opposite direction about 50 feet higher than our aircraft.

The flight to the target was uneventful, 8 to 9/10th cloud. Flying in and out of cloud cover had a stroboscopic effect and was very tiring. Arrived at Munich area, our target, and Biggs lined up on the target in response to the Bomb Aimer’s directions. At this point we were at our most venerable state with the aircraft flying straight and level.

No word had been heard from the rear gunner.. Suddenly a stream of tracer shells passed by at the same height but well away to the port side.  I reported to the skipper, “some tracers just gone by on the port side, Billy. I don’t think it was meant for us and I can’t see anything. Will you weave?”  This was a standard manoeuvre designed both to give better vision and to make the aircraft more difficult to hit. However, Biggs was reluctant to abandon the approach which would mean going around again for a second attempt. He replied, “we are on the bombing run”. To this I replied, well for Christ’s sake do something.!” Biggs replied, “Ok. Mac.”

As he spoke a second stream of cannon shells hit the aircraft. There was immediate conflagration. The over-load fuel tank in the rear of the bomb bay, immediately under the mid-upper gun turret, had been  hit and set on fire. I reported to the pilot. “We’ve had it this time Billy, we’ll never put this fire out.” P/O Biggs said, “OK chaps, bail out. Good luck!”

I left the mid-upper turret, recovered my parachute which was stored in the bin amidst the flames, and went to the rear entrance door. I was unable to open it as it seemed to be jammed. The next thing I remember, there was no noise, just a rushing of wind. I realized I had been unconscious for a moment, the over-load tank had exploded and torn the aircraft apart. The Wireless Operator, F/Sgt. L.E. Moyler, DFM, who had been stationed in the rear throwing out ‘Window’, a radar jamming device, was laying across me. We exchanged a few words.

The rear fuselage, now separated from the rest of the aircraft, was tumbling down. The reek of the 100 octane fuel caused me to go unconscious for short spells. But, fortunately due to a providentially timed twist of the fuselage, I was thrown out, dangerously close to the ground. While descending in my parachute, I saw the front portion of the aircraft coming straight down and I realized that none of the crew in that portion of the aircraft would get out due to the gravitational pressure. 

I landed in a tree and, struggling to get to the ground, hurt my back. The only other survivors were the Bomb Aimer, F/S A. Richards, who was blown out through the front of the machine when the aircraft exploded, and Flt/Sgt. J. Elliott, DFM, who actually came down in the front portion, and by miracle received only a minor cut!

P/O Biggs, trainee, second pilot, Sgt. R.E. Dresser, RCAF; and the navigator,  F/Sgt. J. Read, were not able to free themselves and parachute to safety. The wireless operator was probably thrown from the rear fuselage at the same time I was but, not wearing a parachute, fell to the ground. His body was found close to the remains of the rear fuselage. The rear gunner was most likely killed by cannon shells. 

We three survivors spent the rest of the war in a German Prison Camp. We often discussed the night’s events. My assessment that the first burst of fire was not meant for our aircraft, was reasonable. All agreed that the few second of discussion as to what action to take, was vital in giving the enemy time to make a second attack. All of us agreed that Billy Biggs was an exceptional dedicated pilot. Years later, I still feel that aircrew were worked to hard. There was not enough time given between operations to allow for stress to subside, rendering individuals  to be less alert.


Winching a 2000 lb. Bomb into the bomb bay
 
John Moyles

As above articles refer to Prisoner of War camps I thought it would be interesting to our readers to review some POW activities in previous wars.

During the Napoleonic war French Prisoners of War arrived in England and, at first, were housed in civilian prisons or in prison hulks. Dartmoor, the most notorious English prison, housed hundreds of French prisoners. Another very large one was at Norman Cross, near Peterborough, which was unusual in that it was specially built to hold prisoners-of-war.

Apart from the meagre food the POW received no money and very little in the way of clothing and attention. However the authorities permitted prisoners to trade in order to raise money, though, of course, they had little to offer. However they soon found that the British liked any form of decorated items and their ingenuity sought ways to gratify this market. Every available material was pressed into service including straw, human and animal hair, odd pieces of wood, paper, and above all, bone. Tools were fashioned from nails or any scrap materials and despite the limitations of materials and tools the prisoners produced pieces which ranged from crude to superb. The scope extended from simple bone domino sets to tremendously detailed and complex bone models of men-of-war.

It was with bone that the prisoners excelled for this material was plentiful and therefore available to a large number of prisoners. The peak of perfection was reached with the lovingly-made ship models which were often the combined work of a number of prisoners. The models were usually between 12 to 15 inches long, with rigging of human hair and sails of paper.

Markets were held in the prisons, often daily, when local citizens and traders attended to purchase the work. Prisoners used the money earned to purchase food, clothing, bedding, and medicines. 


Bone model by POW.  Royal Navy Museum Portsmouth.




It is interesting to note that even at this period, early nineteenth century, the prices of some pieces were very high indeed. It is known that near Portsmouth 40 pounds (approx. $80.00) was paid for one of the ship models, the equivalent value today would be something like 800 pounds (approx. $1,600). Today the value would be well in excess of that.

In 1815, with the final defeat of Napoleon, more than 24,000 prisoners from Portsmouth were repatriated.

Pictures and material were contributed by Bob Henderson, historian, POW memorabilia.

HOMEFRONT ARCHIVES AND MUSEUM 
Robert J. Henderson, 
6015-15th Ave. 
Regina, SK   S4T 6V4   Canada. 
Phone: 1.306.543.5822

Recently Bob acquired an 18” model of the German battleship, Bismarck, which was made (from scrap wood) by a German prisoner of war in 1943 in a Canadian POW camp. Some of the superstructure needs tender loving care and I have agreed to tackle the job. Ok you smart mathematicians, if the scale picture of the Bismarck is 28” long and the mast measures 5”, what size would the mast be on the 18” model. If you have to, ask your grandchildren. Why, you ask, is an ex- wireless air gunner attempting to repair a sea going vessel? Well hey, I flew off water without seeing a runway for three and one half years so was 30% airmen and 70% sailor! When transferred to a land based squadron I road my bike across two active runways. But that is another story. 

MEMBERS REPORT IN
NORTHERN SASKATCHEWAN BRANCH

President, Smokie Robson checked in by phone to say their January luncheon was well attended and a time of camaraderie enjoyed by all. Thanks Smokie.



BILL COCKBURN 
Southern Ontario Chapter

WE HAD A SUMMER/FALL WITH SOME SOCIABLE OCCASIONS WHICH INCLUDED THE DISTAFF SIDE.

AT THE NORTH YORK LIBRARY THEATRE WE WITNESSED AN INSPIRING VERSION OF "NEW YORK, NEW YORK!" FOLLOWED BY A DINNER AT LA DOLCE VITA RESTAURANT NEARBY.

WE HAD A LUNCH AT THE LEGION AT ANOTHER TIME AND WE ALSO VISITED THE AEROSPACE MUSEUM AT DOWNSVIEW FOR A MEETING AND HAD CHILI PREPARED BY LINDA, WIFE OF OUR PRESIDENT KEN HILL. VERY TASTY!
 

AT THAT TIME WE FORMALLY PRESENTED THE MUSEUM WITH OUR FN TURRET COMPLETE WITH FOUR BROWNING GUNS. NOW I WONDER WHAT WE CAN TALK ABOUT AT MEETINGS NOW THAT OUR BELOVED TURRET IS GONE !

I WORKED WITH A TRAINING MINISTRY FOR SOME YEARS AND TWO OF MY CO-WORKERS WERE HOWARD HEWER AND BOB MIDDLEMASS. HOWARD HAD BEEN AT METHWOLD ABOUT THE SAME TIME AS I WAS HE WITH 218 (GOLD COAST) SQUADRON.
BOB WAS THE GUEST SPEAKER AT A RECENT MEETING OF THE AIRCREW ASSOCIATION IN TORONTO. HE IS A TRUE AVIATOR, HAVING FLOWN ABOUT TEN AIRCRAFT STARTING WITH THE FLEETWOOD FINCH! 

HE DITCHED OFF THE COAST OF MALTA, FLEW WITH SCREWBALL BEURLING AND GAINED A DFC IN THE PROCESS REACHING THE RANK OF WING COMMANDER. HE CAME THROUGH THE RANKS!

THE SAD NEWS. TWO OF OUR MEMBERS HAVE LEFT US. GORD HARRISON AND GORD THOMAS BOTH SUCCUMBED TO ILLNESS.

GORD HARRISON WAS ALWAYS FULL OF LIFE AT OUR MEETINGS WHEREAS GORD THOMAS WAS QUIET AND RESERVED. BOTH HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN WHO WILL  BE MISSED BY OUR MEMBERS.

BILL COCKBURN CD
SECRETARY



DAVE SUTHERLAND

Gentlemen: Here are a few sites that may be of interest to you.

http://pub70.ezboard.com/fgeneral2080frm15

www.rcaf.com/6group/left.html

http://www.angelfire.com/ca/gcarruth/Ops.html#links



ROSS DOWN

VIP Survivor’s program. After Sept 1, 1990, when a veteran passed away his spouse continued to get the same assistance for 1 year. A new regulation enables the spouse to receive the assistance for life. Those widows who have been discontinued may become reinstated by phoning 1-800-443-0382.

If you would like assistance in dealing with DVA give Ross a call at Charlottetown, PI:
(902) 569-2860
 

THE FAMOUS TAYLOR TRIPLETS


 Tom “TS”,  Julia , Robert.

Tommy S. Taylor was a WAG. The first time I met TS was at Prince Rupert, B.C. in December 1941 when we put #7BR Squadron together at Seal Cove. Tommy had, and still has, a laugh one will never forget. Before you even opened the canteen door you could hear Tommy. Whenever Tom got a few under his belt he would pull a crumpled black and white photo from his battle dress pocket and say, “I’m one of triplets, that’s me in the middle.”

Well, those triplets are still going strong, Tommy at Mather, Manitoba,  brother Robert, ex-radar technician  RCAF, in Toronto, and sister Julia in Calgary. A few years ago Doreene and I went to their 80th birthday bash. As we approached the door of the hall where the festivities were taking place, I said to Doreene, there’s Tommy’s laugh. It was just like approaching the Sgt’s mess at Rupert 58 years before.! 

Julia has a great line, “I arrived first and taught these two fellows everything they know!” The Taylor triplets will be celebrating their 84th birthday this year. Tommy still resides on the farmstead where he was born.

TS went from Rupert to the Weather Squadron at Pat Bay where he flew in the flying gas tank, the mighty Ventura.  Flying into weather over the Pacific and taking readings at altitudes from sea level to maximum altitude, might seem routine, but like all wartime flying, it had it’s moments.

We wish the Taylor triplets many more laughs and years of good health

 
We have purloined the following idea from THE TURRET Ex-RAF Ags Association newsletter.

When I was first introduced to TEE EMM, the aircrew instructional publication which used P/O Prune as an example of “what not to do”, I looked at all the pictures but, when I came to the last page, I was reprimanded in bold print with the words, “Alright, you have looked at the pictures, now go back and read it!” Sixty-five years later we tend to look at pictures and, some times, read the printed portion later.

This brings us to THE TURRET issue 2/88 2003 Winter Edition – pg5.

Every Picture Tells a Story

This feature offers you the chance to submit your photographs for publication. They can be of interesting features and events, insights into famous people or occasions, or even a bit of history you witnessed.

This photograph shows the famous 460 Squadron RAAF (Australia) Lancaster bomber ‘G’ for George resting at Binbrook, Lincolnshire, after completing 90 operations over enemy territory. 

On December 2, 1943, the Squadron dispatched 24 Lancasters to Berlin, five of which failed to return, including the crews of P/O English and Flight Officer Mitchell, carrying Mr. N. Stockton, reporter for Sydney Sun, and Captain N. Greig, Daily Mail. Had either war reporter been flying on ‘George’, they would have survived. An entry in the log book of Dec. 16, 1943, read, “Hot trip to Berlin holes in fuselage, fighter came close, read the letter ‘G’, left hurriedly!”


“G” for George 
Insert – Bill Morris, age 18, rear gunner on 460 RAAF Squadron

‘George’ was flown to Australia in October 1944 and flew around the Oz on a War Loans campaign until 1946. It was ten years before it was displayed at the Australian War Museum. The past couple of years ‘George’ has been renovated, and in December will be reintroduced as the prime exhibit in Canberra’s Australian War Memorial.

The other photo is of myself, aged 18, as a rear gunner on 460 RAAF Squadron. The Squadron had more than 1,000 aircrew killed in action from 1942 to 1945.

Bill Morris
Tupsley, Hereford.




Now, re-wind to our Short Bursts publication. Some members store a wealth of wartime information but are reluctant, or physically incapable of putting pen to paper, or finger to key board. We all have the old black and whites stored away. Pictures that speak a thousand words. So send you Editor a picture with a brief explanation. 

I will return all pictures as soon as I scan them onto the computer. This modern technology is mind-boggling.  I even have pictures of 10 Gremlins saved in my computer photo file. So lets take advantage of the World Wide Webb and help the memories live on.

Another Anecdote from Don Macfie

BEING A GOOD BOY

In the spring of 1946 I was doing internal flights with 435 Sqdrn. on DC’s ranging all over Europe. This fine day brought me to a spot in Northern Germany and by this time I was quite skilled in the ways of the black market. Selling cigarettes for 2 marks each, buying champagne at 2 ½ marks a bottle and selling it back in London for five quid. Pretty good life, too bad you chaps missed it.

This day my cigarette supply had dried up but I had a loaf of bread  I had picked up in Oslo. Walking along enjoying a beautiful sunny day, looking for a contact, I met a stunning blond lady. She had a crying, starving, child, in each hand. Recognizing the bread, she stopped me, and made me understand that she would spend the night with me if I would give her the bread.

I handed her the bread, turned, and went back to the aerodrome.

(Ed. Don had completed a tour on 422 Squadron before going to 435 Squadron after VE-Day. When hostilities ceased in Europe, many of us were transferred to transport Squadrons. I went to 426 Squadron (Liberators) carrying troops between UK and India. We didn’t deal in cigarettes or bread, our items of profit were carpets, ivory, cherry brandy, leather, silks, and on one occasion, a chunk of the Great Pyramid! I shudder to think of the penalties for such action today. Fortunately the Statute of Limitations prevails.

The customs officials in the UK were on the lookout for black marketers but they had few staff and could not cover all bases. We always had a contact in the tower to alert us. Returning to the UK we would call the tower when crossing the Channel and ask if there was oil on the runway. The WAAFs on duty would get the message and if the customs man was there the answer was “Yes”. We would then find an excuse to divert to another base. This only happened once, but it makes a good story.

I’m sure many of you have amusing anecdotes. Share them with us.)


The laying up of the Ex-RAF Air Gunner’s Association Standard Controversy

This topic is mentioned here as some of our Members are also Members of the now defunct RAF Air Gunner’s Association. The controversy revolves around the question “where should the Standard be permanently housed?”

The Standard was purchased by the East Sussex Air Gunner’s Branch , designated as the Associations Standard, and is presently held by that Branch. The Ex-RAF AGs Association Executive decided, unilaterally, to place the standard in the Air Gunner’s memorial at Elvington.

However, there are Members and some Branches that feel the Standard should rest at Lincoln Cathedral. They feel that the question should be put to the membership by way of referendum. The Executive have rejected this suggestion and placed the matter in the hands of a Solicitor with instructions to have the Standard delivered to the Executive.

Many of us held Membership in both Associations. If you would like to become involved, please contact the following:

Executive:    Secretary                                                        Editor  THE TURRET
                     Bill Bailey,                                                     Ron Bramley,
                     27 St. Albans Rd.                                           35 Morley Rd.,
                     Arnold, Nottingham NG5 6JH     UK            Nottingham NG3 6LL UK
                     Ph. 0115 920 0860                                          Ph. 0115 956 9266
                                                                                             Email r.a.f.bram@amserve.net

Representing Membership at large:

Andrew Colvin, (Secretary, London Ags Branch and Standard Bearer)
131 Ambleside Drive,
Southend-on-sea,
ESSEX SS1 2UW  UK
Tel.01702-610262

ABOVE & BEYOND

 
The term “above and Beyond the Call of Duty” is one we freely associate with bravery and determination of the highest order. It is generally known best as a part of the citations given those dedicating their lives in service to others in the air forces, army, navy, and police and fire departments of the world. It is a special form of recognition for a person or group who, in the performance of duties, have given more to their fellow man than could have reasonably been expected of them.

The term “Above and Beyond the Call of Duty”, abbreviated to “Above and Beyond” has been adopted by the Commonwealth Air Training Plan as the theme for our $6,000,000 capital campaign. It represents three important points.
 

1. In our goal to preserve the memory of those who participated in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and the Allied Air Forces of World War 11, aspire to be a museum that provides service “Above and Beyond”.
2. Those who provide volunteer services for our museum comprise a determined crew that frequently ventures “Above and Beyond” in their effort to fulfill the mandate of the Museum.
3. Many of you have made significant and much appreciated financial contributions in the past. We are now asking you, once again, to go “Above and Beyond” in your financial support of the CATP Museum.


If you have any questions please direct them to: 
CATP Museum Inc. 
Box 3, Grp. 520, RR5, 
Brandon, MB   R7A 5Y5 
 Phone: (204) 727-2444

(Ed. A reminder that the Museum hosts our Web Page enabling the Ex-Air Gunner’s Association Members to keep in contact. Don’t forget to pass the hat at your luncheons.)


From our Bard, George Olson

Air Gunner’s Career
(This sign on an air gunner’s turret did appear)
“Abandon hope all of ye who dare enter here”
In their turrets many air gunners would die
While on an ‘Operational Tour’ they did fly
It’s where these air gunners ended their career

Conceited Air Gunner
An air gunner who was filled with conceit
Tried to make out with the girls he did meet
But the girls who he met paid him no heed
Though very hard with them he would plead
So he never succeeded, he only met with defeat

Air Gunner’s Turret
Why is the air gunner’s turret so small?
The discomfort in these turrets does appal
No comfort in there can an air gunner find
Yet for hours in his turret he’ll be confined
I can’t understand why they did this at all

Tail Gunner’s woes
Pity for the tail gunner should be shown
He has to sit in the bomber’s tail all alone
He looks back at where they have been
Where they are heading to can’t be seen
So the dangers lying ahead are unknown

To see the review on George Olson’s book of wartime poetry 
NO PLACE TO HIDE, 
go to the Short Bursts’ archives April 2003

OBITUARIES
MCVEAN, W.  #0089, HONEY HARBOUR, ON:  Bill was one of the early members of the Association and a staunch supporter.  He joined up in Toronto in March 1943, and graduated January '44  with Course #68 at #9 B/G, Mont Joli, PQ.  As a Sergeant Air Gunner he was posted overseas in March '44 where he joined #415 'Swordfish' Squadron on August 16/44.  He completed 29 Ops as a Tail Gunner and 5 more as a Mid Under.  Completed tour Feb. 17/45.  Posted home in April he was released from service May 30/45.  He had joined up at age 17 and discharged at age 19 with the rank of WO11.  Bill was a great participant and good company at many of our National Reunions.
 

CANTERA, D. R.  #0932, EDMONTON, AB:  Dave passed away suddenly January 8/04.  Enlisting June '42 as R159333 and selected for Air Gunner training at #3 Manning Depot, Edmonton.  He graduated from #3 B&G, MacDonald, MB.  Conversion at #1653 HCU, Stradishall he completed his first Tour with #90(RAF) Squadron and his 2nd with 405(RCAF).  During this period he served with 3 Group PFF and was commissioned J87395.  Dave remained with the Peacetime Force in various Flying and Administrative positions until retirement at Training Command Headquarters, Winnipeg.  Dave never missed a meeting or a function of the Ex Air Gunner's Association.
 

THOMAS, G. S.  #0995, SCARBOROUGH, ON:  Gord passed away following lengthy illness.  He enlisted May 1942 and was discharged October 1945.  Selected for WAG training he was 'joed' for Tarmac Duty at SFTS Hagersville, ON before attending #4 Wireless School, Course #51 at Guelph, ON and receiving his Brevet at #1 B&G, Jarvis.  Served as Staff WAG at Navigational School, Malton.  Received Op Training at #34 OTU Pennfield Ridge, NB, then transferred to RAFTC #45 flying from Dorval, PQ and Nassau, Bahamas - trips were to the UK and India.  Gord was a quiet, reserved gentleman.
 

HARRISON, G. E.  #1241, AGINCOURT, ON:  Gord attended Manning Deot at Toronto where he was selected for WAG training.  He attended #3 Wireless School at Winnipeg with Gunnery at #8 B&G Lethbridge where he received his brevet.  After completing Operational Training Unit #32 at Pat Bay, BC he was posted to #117 Squadron in SEAC, Group #224 where he attained the rank of Flying Officer, J94859.  As a member of the Ex Air Gunner's Association, he was full of life at local functions.

Contact: Charles Yule ~ yulec@mts.net
EDITORS REPORT

In the November and December page, 2003, we asked for volunteers to take over the editorship. There have been no takers so we have decided to continue until the gas tanks register “fumes only”. However there is a bright side, a number of Members sent in material and one Chapter appointed a Short Bursts correspondent. It would be encouraging if other branches did this. So as it stands, as long as the CATP Museum, Brandon Manitoba, will continue to sponsor us, we will try to get the page up on the first of each month. 

Note the above article taken from THE TURRET. If you have any pictures, send them in. I will scan them into the computer and try to get them back in the mail to you the same day.

As most of you know, I am a P/O Prune fan. Thanks to the late Bill Hooper who created this loveable character with whom so many of us identify. Well, Prune did something slightly out of character this past Christmas. Prune journeyed to Bethlehem. The following picture extinguishes all doubt.

In our church pageant the Shepherds required staves and Prune, for the first time in his career, volunteered his services.


Our grandson, Duncan, seen out of costume, was one of the wise men.

Answers to Aircraft Recognition:

(A)  Dornier Do 18L           (B) Dornier Do 26
      Reconnaissance                    Reconnaissance 
Span 77’ 8” L 63’ 4”             Span 98’ 6”  L 80’ 6” 

(D)  Cant Z 506B                (E)  Catalina 1&2 2 twin wasps
      Reconnaissance                      Reconnaissance 
Span 89’  L 62’                       Span 104’  l63’ 10” 

(Don’t feel bad, you would not have seen them at 20,000 Ft.)

Please drop us some copy and pictures for March Issue.
Keep well.
John and Doreene Moyles,
Ste. 233 - 1060 Dorothy St.,
Regina, Sask.     S4X 3C5  CANADA
Ph. (306) 949-6112
Email  tweedhouse@sasktel.net
Regional Meetings


Southern Ontario Chapter
Royal Canadian Legion
Wilson Branch 527
948 Sheppard Avenue West
Downsview,Ontario
We meet the first Wednesday of each month at the Legion hall 1:00 pm. 
No meetings July, August, September.
Contact persons: 
Ken Hill  ~  President ~  905.789.1912
Bill Cockburn  ~  Secretary ~  416.492.1024
Email:  piperbill@rogers.com

Winnipeg
Location - Royal Canadian Legion Br.#4 St. James Legion.
Date - Third Thursday of each month.
Time - Luncheon meeting (provide your own lunch).
Contact Member - Charlie Yule Ph. (204) 254-6264.


Northern Saskatchewan
Location - Lynx Wing Ave. C North, Saskatoon.
Date - Third Monday of the month.
Time - Luncheon meetings.
Contact Member - C.A. "Smokey" Robson  Ph. (306) 374-0547.


Northern Alberta Branch
Location - Norwood Branch 178, 11150 – 82 Street, Edmonton, AB
Date -  The first Thursday of each month.
Time - 12:00 hours.
Contact Members - E. H. "Ted" Hackett (780)962-2904 
or Sven Jensen (780)465-7344.


Southern Alberta
Location - Royal Canadian Legion  #264 
Kensington, Calgary
Date: Second Monday of each month.
Time - 11:30 hours.
Contact Member: Dave Biggs Ph: (403)236-7895
or Doug Penny Ph: (403)242-7048.
Note: 
October meeting time moved to third Monday. 
Also there are no meetings in July and August, however, a Barbecue is usually held  at Larry Robinson's ranch in Okatoks during that time.


British Columbia Branch

Meeting time and local: 2nd Tuesday of each month at 11:30 
Firefighters Social & Athletic Club, 
6515 Bonsor Avenue, 
Burnaby, B.C. V5H 3E8 
Super eating facilities
Contact person - Dave Sutherland       Ph. 604-431-0085
E-mail distilledwater@shaw.ca


Members across the Country are encouraged to 
send current information regarding 
regular meeting places, dates, and Contact Members, to

John and Doreene Moyles, 
Ste. 233 - 1060 Dorothy St., 
Regina, Sask.     S4X 3C5  CANADA
Ph. (306) 949-6112





Members are requested to send their experiences, articles, anecdotes, pictures, etc., to John Moyles and I will forward them to our Web Master in Brandon. Articles and Last Post items will be deleted from the page each month after the designated Member in each region has had an opportunity to copy the material for their Members. Notices of deceased Members are to be sent to Charlie Yule who is still our 'Keeper of the Rolls'. This is your SHORT BURSTS with no printing or mailing costs, and no deadlines! The Brandon Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum has agreed to host our AG page. However, as it costs the Museum $35.00 per month to maintain the Web Page, it is suggested that each Ex-AG group contribute periodic donations to the Museum to help off-set this expense, and to enhance the work they are doing.  We thank our Web Master, Bill Hillman, for his volunteer time and expertise.

Donations can be made directly to: 

CATP Museum Inc.
Box 3, Grp. 520, RR5,
Brandon, MB   R7A 5Y5
 Phone: (204) 727-2444
 

 
NAVIGATION MAP TO THE SHORT BURST BACK ISSUES IN ARCHIVE

Read Them All The Way Back To March 2001
Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum
BACK TO THE CATP MUSEUM CONTENTS PAGE
 
Visit Our WWII Nostalgia Online e-Zine 
and Past Issues Archive at:
As You Were: Contents
Commonwealth Air Training Plan Museum: RCAFHMCS Prince Robert: Hillman WWII Scrapbook - RCNXII Dragoons - 26 RCA Museum

Volunteer Webmaster: William G. Hillman
41 Kensington Crescent
Brandon, MB  R7A 6M4
BILL & SUE-ON HILLMAN ECLECTIC STUDIO
 © 2008 Bill Hillman and Ex-Air Gunners Association